Poverty Awareness Month Should be Every Month

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January is Poverty Awareness Month. During this time, many organizations work to raise awareness of poverty and highlight the good work done by organizations across the country to provide opportunity for people and families in need.

It is tragic to us at Fahe that in a nation widely regarded as the wealthiest in the history of human existence, so few people care about poverty, as reflected in the need to have a designated “Poverty Awareness Month” in hopes of getting the attention of the general public.

We lack the voices and political will to end poverty, even though we have the national wealth to do so. As a result, 1 in 5 children live in poverty in the United States. In persistent poverty regions that reaches 1 in 3. Sadly, there is a category for child poverty that exceeds 50%. Yes, 50%, and is found in the Delta, Appalachia, and Native American Country.

The estimated 40.6 million people who live below the poverty line don’t have the luxury of only facing poverty one month out of the year. So we encourage those people who are strong enough to live with compassion and those who work to find solutions to raise their voices every day. Only then can we hope to truly raise awareness and dispel the apathy surrounding poverty. If we ever want to live in a world where poverty is taken seriously, where we can prioritize the well being of our fellow man and not rely on special events to grab the attention of the public, then all of us need to raise our voices together and say “it ends now!”

Aaron Phelps

Aaron collects stories from Fahe Members and the people they help in order to present the needs of Appalachia to the public through written word and video. In his free time he nerds it up by playing RPGs, writing fantasy stories, and playing drums.
Aaron Phelps
Aaron Phelps
Aaron collects stories from Fahe Members and the people they help in order to present the needs of Appalachia to the public through written word and video. In his free time he nerds it up by playing RPGs, writing fantasy stories, and playing drums.

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